About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CNNW 10
CNN 8
MSNBC 8
MSNBCW 8
FBC 4
WRC (NBC) 3
CSPAN 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
WBAL (NBC) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
in the past, the slow response to hurricane katrina, the formaldehyde ligand trailers purchased for katrina victims to live in. and now it is becoming more and more clear hurricane sandy may well be another example of the government blowing i it's a staten island resident had a same complaints residents of new orleans had seven years ago. where is fema when we need them. other problems that liberal bureaucracy huggers like to ignore. according to a new analysis from the heritage foundation, fema dollars after all taxpayer dollars look more and more like a goody bag, honeypot for presidents to raise. think of them as a political porkbarrel spending agency because that is unfortunately what it has become. the disaster declarations are on the rise. reagan had 28 per year on average. under nine under bill clinton. obama, 153. he takes the cake. heritage foundation rates to put this in perspective in somewhere in america in 2011 disaster occurred every day and a half. so strong it required the intervenon of the federal government because each of these disasters overwhelm the state and the local
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
$50 billion making it the nation's fourth costliest disaster behind katrina, 9/11 and hurricane andrew. >>> homeowners in new york, new jersey, and connecticut may be spared a costly deductible after state governors declared sandy did not make landfall as a hurricane. >>> and business is about to boom for companies that made oprah's annual favorite things list. a few of this year's favs, an $1800 battery and peddle powered bike, microsoft's new $500 surface tablet and a $40 blue velvet cake. you're watching "early today." >>> we are watching a nice weekend forecast shaping up in many areas of the west. only need the umbrella in a few spots. clouds lingering on the coast with on-and-off showers in areas like portland. temperatures seeable for this time of year. still lingering moisture in the northwest. looking mostly cloudy up there. nice in the southwest and areas traveling the inner mountain west, no problems whatsoever. enjoy your weekend. >> bill, thanks so much. >>> a bucks county, pennsylvania, family is still without power like millions of other power in the northeast. this fami
. sand yes's price tag is $50 billion. making it the fourth costliest disaster behind katrina, 9/11 and andrew. >>> homeowners may be spared a costly deductible. >>> and business is about to boom for companies that made oprah's annual favorite things list. we always love this one. a few of your favs, an $1800 battery and peddle pered bike, microsoft's new $500 surface tablet and a $40 blue velvet cake. blue velvet. just ahead, bill karins is going to have your weekend weather forecast, plus how one family in eastern pennsylvania is making the best of being without power. you're watching "early today." >>> well, welcome back. we'll get into your weekend forecast starting with today. no big storms across the country. nice and calm and mild in the southern half of the country. little chilly up along minneapolis, chicago and all across the northeast. little bit of moisture begins to increase in texas with some showers maybe even into tennessee and arkansas. nothing too bad. as we go through sunday, everything still pretty much the same. it's really, lynn, not until we get into tuesda
what is going on. and the first thing we noticed was how much it felt like katrina. but it was much different in casualties with katrina, but then looking in the windows, and seeing men, women and children waving at us. most of them were smiling. the reason most of them are smiling is because the water has gone down a bit. the feeling is that it will continue to go down and they will be perhaps to start walking out of their houses tomorrow. it's not guaranteed yet. we saw scores of people waving at us, waiting to get out of their homes. we saw people trying to leave on their own. they seemed confused. a few people were driving through the water and so the cars got stuck and they could not push them. a police officer got out and went to rescue the people. took the woman on his shoulder and brought her to the shovel we were sitting in and the mayor and i helped to pull the woman in and the two other people in, that's the situation. it's incredible. right now, there are people in the dark and cold, waiting to be able to come out of their homes safely. >> it's amazing as you tell it. ga
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
. >> brown would have said more but he was busy responding to katrina. >> garbage, crap, and nonsense. >> you're watching fox. you're hearing about a state department, the cia does nothing. >> you are misleading the american people. >> at least we don't live in swing state hell. >> jeep, now owned by the italians, is thinking of moving all production to china. >> the biggest load of bull in the world. >> why do you say these things, mi romney? >> joe biden is using his teeth to illuminate hoboken. >> find that special someone in the early voting line. >> our destiny is in the hands of the american people. >> i will fight for you and your family every single day as hard as i know how. >> let's get to our panel, dana 34i8 bank is political columnist for "the washington post" and toure is my colleague and the co-host of "the cycle." desperate mitt, desperate measures. in your column this week you write, when the stakes are high, as they are for mr. romney, it must win ohio, the truth is often the first casualty. does that explain mr. romney's completely dishonest and disturbing ad about chrysler
spiriva. sxwrirchlgts we talk about katrina. there is the long island express as well that was hit in the middle east. it claimed hundreds and hundreds of lives. the death toll was so high. there was hardly any warning or preparation for that matter. well, in the wake of this week's superstorm time magazine is exploring ways to protect people and property from these monster hurricanes. brian joins us live from new york. brooen, it's great to see you. first of all, very compelling articles here. i want to start off by talking about the power grid. you've got millions of folks along the east coast still without power. now they are freezing. we're going to talk about the real cold temperatures coming up over the weekend. how do we focus on the power system to make it more resilient, stronger? >> well, one thing you can do is to look actually at buried power lines. 18% of distribution lines in the u.s. are actually underground. of course, if they're above ground, then they're vulnerable to being knocked down by trees, which is what's happened in all kinds of storms, including a big one
a look at what's going on. the first thing, we noticed how much it felt like katrina to us there are differences, there are no casualties here, but it felt like new orleans going down the watery streets and looking in the window, seeing men, women, and children waving at us. most of them were smiling. the reason they are smiling, the water is receding. it will continue to recede and perhaps as early as tomorrow, they will be able to start walking out of their houses. not guaranteed just yet. we saw scores of people waving at us, waiting to get out of their home. we saw a case of some people trying to leave. seemed confused. two people driving vehicles through four feet of water. they got stuck, then started pushing their cars. a police officer with us on the front loader got out, took the woman, put the woman on her shoulder, brought her to the shovel we were sitting in. the mayor and i helped pull the woman in that's the situation. incredible. right behind me, people in the dark and the cold waiting to be able to come out of their homes safely. >> it's amazing as you tell
katrina where it was failures on the part of the federal government's response. you don't have that negative aspect. you have chris christie, the most visible republican in the country. certainly according to the media one of the better liked ones. he's out there using his platform to vouch for the leadership of the democratic president. i think that makes a powerful statement to people. i think having bloomberg weigh in makes a pretty strong statement to people as well. and i think just -- it's tough to quantify this. i think it's impossible to quantify this. to me it creates this noise that's sort of in the air, in the media air, and sort of in the conversational air in this country. it creates noise that i think takes wavering voters who maybe were soft obama supporters or soft romney supporters, i could see it moving them, you know, a small share of people, but i could see it moving people toward obama making them more comfortable with the idea of re-electing him. if it's a 1% or something, small, but it's big in the context of this election. >> in the context of endorsemen
're guaranteeing they will be in effect of any need them. we saw that in connection with katrina and normans, and how poorly fema performed. i think it is a striking contrast that now you have a very vociferous republicann governor of new jersey who is saying, fema was there right away and was released on its game. so it is possible for the government to perform poorly impossible for them to perform well. i think the political drama was all played out in new jersey was well worth considering. >> paul barrett, i want to move to the issue of gun control. mayor bloomberg also raise the issue of and control and why he is supporting president obama. he said 2008, obama ran as a pragmatic but-let me see. he ran as a pragmatic problem solver but as president he devoted little time and effort to developing a system in a coalition of centrist, which doomed of repress on illegal guns, tax reform, job creation and deficit reduction. in fact, interestingly, he is somewhat critical of president obama on gun-control and you are very well positioned to talk about this issue, as your last book is called "gl
hurricane katrina days, used to run fema when katrina happened. he said this about what the president is doing. my guess is that he wants to gt ahead of it, he doesn't want to be accused of not getting on top of it, paying attention to it or playing politics in the middle of it. he went on to say thabout benghazi. what do you make of this? >> it's interesting coming from someone who has an abysmal record on handling emergencies. where i'm from, my family was evacuated, are happy that the president jumped in and moved quickly in response to this storm. we don't take too much credence from somebody with a record like mr. brown. >> thank you for your time. >> thank you. >> interesting question to have about fema. reporters throwing questions at governor romney yesterday. they were asking him a number of times -- he wouldn't state -- do you think this is problematic for the governor? >> i don't think so at all. first of all, let me just respond to jen. she just blew off the criticism about benghazi. you listen to her saying in a crisis the president hunkered down in the white house, gett
from and they're doing that with huge pumps. some of them deployed after katrina. they're pumping right now i think 700,000 gallons an hour. they hope later by later today they'll be pumping some 2 million gallons an hour. they're attacking this right now. at the same time, they try to push the debris out of their city. >> any idea, jim, how long that will take, that process of pumping it out? >> no. i don't really know how long it will take. because, you know, they're going to pump basements out. there's a high school near here. pumping that basement out. their gymnasium and back in to it so all the water's going to come out of the homes in to those lakes even as those lakes are being emptied and going to empty them all the way down to the bottom. it's certainly going to be a process. a weeklong process but at the same time the long-term outlook is here to rebuild and rebuild by memorial day, before the beginning of summer 2013. and they know that's even a tall order. may seem like seven months away, eight months away, no, there's so much work to be done in rebuilding it takes every bi
exactly because we do not know the total number. some think it will only be second to katrina. there will be tens of billions of dollars. we are doing a continual resolution until april 1. whether or not that will be enough remains to be seen. every time there's a disaster on the west coast, an earthquake, a flood and the mississippi, a tornado, we pull together as congress, republicans and democrats and do what has to be done. i do not expect new jersey will be treated any differently. i know my colleagues in surrounding states, especially in new york and new england states were very hard hit. i have been in contact with republicans and democrats. i think we are going to join together and do what is necessary. we do not know what those numbers are. i think it is premature to speculate too much. host: thank you for joining us. good luck to you. guest: thank you. host: a want to point to an editorial in bloomberg. that cannot from michael bloomberg, the mayor of new york. he writes that he votes for president to lead on climate change. he says the climate is changing how the in
of this from the history of the chicago fire, san francisco earthquake to katrina, when you take the underpinnings of society and strip it bare, when you take out the things that are the linchpin of how people interact and cooperate with each other, that is when you reduce the power relations to the most raw. nothing more political than the moments of disaster because it lays bare who has power in a society and who doesn't. >> just the fact, also one of the things that government does, one of the things government must do, is help protect us from the things we can't protect ourselves from. when we have a disaster, fire, a hurricane, you have to ask the question is government doing all it can do to insulate us from this and if government or people out there are denying climate change and some of these things may be related to that, that's a pretty big dereliction of duty. >> rick perry did pray for rain during fires that burned in texas through most of the year. we didn't get to talk about the president and what he might do if he's re-elected. >> people should watch "up" tomorrow.
, reminds me of the hospital stories we heard in katrina and new orleans there must have been patients on ventilators that had to be manually kept alive and getting babies out of the nicu in the dead of night, when the power has gone out. i can't imagine how difficult that was. >> it reminded me very much of my time in new orleans after katrina. the adults, it was interesting, the adults on respirators, they batteries. they were brought down, some of them 15 flights of stairs on respirators with batteries. for some reason the neonatal -- the little newborn babies, their respirators did not have babies. doctors or nurses had to do bagging, where the doctors, the nurse squeezes air right into the baby's lungs so they're walking nine flights down from the nicu, while the whole time squeezing air into the babies' lungs. >> as far as you know, no fatalities. >> as far as we know, all is doing well. some people right now, anderson are asking the question, why didn't they evacuate sooner. i think that's a question that is going to be talked about at nyu for a while now. >> yeah. certainly the
in the plane flying over katrina. >> there's a lot of water down there. >> stephanie: there's no small amount of rumbling on the right. some republicans labeled him judas christie and rush limbaugh called the governor -- wait for it -- fat. [♪ circus music ♪] >> and accused him of being addicted to oxycontin. >> we have some other comments come up in the right-wing world about chris christie. >> stephanie: really? here is [ inaudible ] with -- >> the guy who's numbers are too gay -- >> stephanie: yeah. seven polls released in ohio obama plus two, obama plus three, obama plus five hashtag not that complicated. he write ts now watch in frustration, only a single romney-leading poll probably from rasmussen. apparently the pollsters are all effeminate pollsters too. please stop letting facts get in the way of the gop narrative. >> for a numbers guy he has an awesome sense of humor. >> stephanie: yeah. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: after brutal polling day, romney team reassures they are going to win. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: not included on their list
sandy. many of these crews also responded after hurricane katri katrina. because so many gas stations have no power they are taking their own fuel and other supplies with them. they're working shifts of at least 12 hours. and be sure to stay with news 4 and nbc washington.com for continuing coverage of hurricane sandy's impact. remember to help storm victims you can go to red cross.org or call 1-800-help now or text the word red cross to 90999 to make a $10 donation. >>> today is the last chance for d.c. voters to head to the polls before the rush of tuesday's election. early voting officially ends in the district tonight. last week people waited in long lines to cast their ballots. this weekend early voting in each of the eight wards runs through 9:00 tonight. it's also the last day for in person absentee voting in virginia, a state that's back battleground for votes that everyone will be watching. news 4's derrick ward is live this morning in fairfax as the first voters roll in. good morning, derrick. >> reporter: good morning. indeed this is the last stage for early absentee voting
't iraq. it wasn't wmds. it wasn't the horror of all of that. it was katrina and being caught sleeping and feeling like they had abandoned people in new orleans. it impacted them in a deeply personal way. these -- obviously people's lives are on the line here, too, but it also -- it's a sign of leadership. >> there is no pollster in the world who can get at the feelings, the emotions, of someone, a family, who has lost power for three or four days. what does that do to this election? that kind of emotional wild card. there's no way of telling what people feel or who they get angry at. >> one thing the president benefits from, i think, because again, i don't think the white house is going to mess this up. i bet you $10,000, they've got in the tri-state area, three extraordinarily aggressive governors, two democrats, one republican. but chris christie -- >> good way of putting it. >> cuomo and malloy is going to be very aggressive and work very close with the president and the white house because they are concerned about the people, not just the politics of it, they're concerned about th
at any national tragedy from katrina to hurricane andrew, you ask yourself, did fema come through that without criticism? did everyone believe fema was the best source of aid in that situation? the local governments could be better sources to handle these situations. >> i think historically a smart and efficient federal response has saved a lot of lives and helped a lot of people. but you should be careful not to politicize this today, but i do think that he's going to have to answer these questions. they have five days to go, six days to go, we are in the middle of this disaster. these questions are going to come up until he gives a real answer. >> i was watching the press conference yesterday with president obama addressing this at the red cross and what he said was that the states need to take this issue at hand. so do the private companies. they need to lean forward and that fema is there for them. so it was an interesting response also in the -- that's what i thought, but i'm not quite sure there. it is nice to have you weigh in on that. >> when mitt romney said that at the d
happened ever since 2005. of course, katrina being the top of that list. the storm right now located over buffalo. it's going to be a slow exit over the next two days. it's still remaining with clouds and raw, cool temperatures. but the devastating weather is by far over with. just some showers out there today. the rest of the halloween forecast, by the way, for the country looks just fine. the exception being out there in the northwest. of course, we'll have more about sandy and its effects on the election coming up next, harold ford jr. stay with us here on "morning joe." where others fail, droid powers through. introducing the new droid razr maxx hd by motorola. now more than ever droid does. very sore looking kinda blistery. it was like a red rash... like somebody had set a bag of hot charcoal on my neck. i was a firefighter for 24 years. but, i have never encountered such a burning sensation until i had the shingles. i remember it well. i was in the back yard doing yard work. i had this irritation going on in my lower neck. i changed shirts because i thought there was something in th
think it will be second only to katrina and there will be tens of billions of dollars involved in the recovery effort. we know we're working on a continuing resolution that will run until april 1st. whether that will be enough or not, it remains to be seen in. every time there is a disaster on the west coast, an earthquake, a flood, a tornado, we always pull together and do it has to be done. i did not expect new jersey will be treated any differently. i know my colleagues in surrounding states were very hard hit. i have been in contact with both democrats and republicans. we will join together and do what is necessary. we do not know the numbers are right now so it is no point to speculate. host:. you for joining us this morning. >> among the delegation that went with president obama on the tour of damage in new jersey. we're waiting to take you live for the latest update from fema their reporting the department of homeland security is temporarily waiving some maritime rules to allow foreign oil tankers from the gulf of mexico to enter northeast and ports. it jury -- janet of
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)